History of Panauti

Panauti is one of the oldest towns in Nepal, consisting of many temples that are still present till this day dating back to the 15th Century or earlier. It has been debated that Panauti was founded by Ananda Malla (1274-1310BC), others believe that there is a golden scripture dated 1385, which is located within the Indreswor temple stating that King Harisingh Dev founded the town.

The Indreswor temple is one of the largest and tallest pagoda style temples in Nepal. It was originally built over a lingam in 1294, making it the oldest surviving temple of Nepal. The roof struts embellishing the two lower stories of the temple are distinct Nepalese wood-carving and architecture. The upper section of the temple is hung with pots and pans, offerings from young married couples hoping for a happy and prosperous family life. Unfortunately, the 1998 earthquake casued considerable damage and the building is still awaiting for restoration.
Other than this temple, there is also the king’s palace, which has yet to be excavated to a larger extent in order to reveal more about Panauti. Nevertheless, there are many artifacts and remnants such as stone taps, bricks, water wells and coins found amongst some of the excavated sections of the palace.

Although Panauti was founded independently, as time went on the influence of Bhaktapur (an ancient Newar town in the east corner from Katmandu) increased and later became part of Bhaktapur up until the 18th Century. In 1763 King Prithvi Narayan Shah in the unification process annexed Panauti to the larger and greater Nepal.

Panauti is one of the oldest towns in Nepal, consisting of many temples that are still present till this day dating back to the 15th Century or earlier. It has been debated that Panauti was founded by Ananda Malla (1274-1310BC), others believe that there is a golden scripture dated 1385, which is located within the Indreswor temple stating that King Harisingh Dev founded the town.The Indreswor temple is one of the largest and tallest pagoda style temples in Nepal. It was originally built over a lingam in 1294, making it the oldest surviving temple of Nepal. The roof struts embellishing the two lower stories of the temple are distinct Nepalese wood-carving and architecture. The upper section of the temple is hung with pots and pans, offerings from young married couples hoping for a happy and prosperous family life. Unfortunately, the 1998 earthquake casued considerable damage and the building is still awaiting for restoration.Other than this temple, there is also the king’s palace, which has yet to be excavated to a larger extent in order to reveal more about Panauti. Nevertheless, there are many artifacts and remnants such as stone taps, bricks, water wells and coins found amongst some of the excavated sections of the palace.Although Panauti was founded independently, as time went on the influence of Bhaktapur (an ancient Newar town in the east corner from Katmandu) increased and later became part of Bhaktapur up until the 18th Century. In 1763 King Prithvi Narayan Shah in the unification process annexed Panauti to the larger and greater Nepal.

Credit: HamroPanauti.com.np